Our blog just got posted in Portuguese!: What Advice Would You Give Your Younger Self?

So this is pretty fun: our blog post regarding what advice you would give to your younger self just appeared in Portuguese on Runrun.it! How fun is that? Runrun.it is a professional project management software company that works to gather and formalize communication between teams, with new products in Spanish for Latin American users in Mexico, Colombia, Chile, Peru, Argentina, Uruguay and the DR.

Here’s an image of the blog in Portuguese (which you can also read live here) and the original blog is below for your reading pleasure. What advice would you give your younger self? Let us know in the comments below and obrigado!

What words of advice would you give to your younger self (in your 20s)?

Portuguese Blog

ORIGINAL BLOG POST IN ENGLISH:

  1. Explore, explore, explore. You think you know what you want but you have no idea what else might really be for you if you only were aware of it. Network. Ask around. Be curious about what people do. It’s great to be very focused on a goal, but don’t be so tunnel-visioned that you don’t notice what else is out there that could be better for you. Discover (and pay attention to) what you’re good at. There were little signs all along the way – even as a child, but you had no idea a career could be made out of those things. All of these things are clues to the way you were made and shaped to perform – and ultimately where you’ll find the most success and likely be happiest. Volunteer in your field of interest. Volunteer for new projects / assignments. It’s another way to keep exploring and testing your capabilities, discovering new strengths and talents and connecting the dots between all those things. Don’t pass up opportunities to speak, to lead, to organize. All these things will not only stretch you but will give you visibility to others.
  2. You never know who’s watching you – so always perform your very best. Even the seemingly insignificant tasks – the way you organize and prep for a meeting, lead it, contribute to it. Your creative thoughts you bring to a project. Your execution. Even the e-mails you exchange with colleagues in and outside of your organization. You never know what small thing someone may see and think “that young lady’s got something special here,” or “I like how he did that.” With that being said, you need a network to watch you in the first place! It’s never too young to start networking. Connections and relationships are everything. And not just connecting for the sake of connecting, but to allow people to get to know you, understand where you are in life, to get an idea of what you feel your capabilities are but also to allow people to look you over and perhaps be able to tell you something about your own capabilities / gifts that you weren’t even aware of. Networking is essential and that cannot be stressed enough.
  3. Remember, you are in control of your OWN brand. At the end of the day, no matter who you work for or what you do, you still are in control of your own brand. Wherever you go. Whatever title you have. While you’re building a reputation for yourself and figuring yourself out, remember that you are your own person in any situation. In any meeting. Speak up for the things that you know are right. Don’t be afraid to express your ideas just because you’re young. Bring value to every conversation you’re in. Ultimately what you’re building are success stories for yourself. Success stories that you carry from job to job, until perhaps one day you own a business of your own. This is the kind of confidence you have to carry in yourself at all times. Never feel susceptible to or afraid of losing a job. You have to know your own power and your own worth – your own value – wherever you go. It is the freedom that keeps you sane but also liberates you to speak the truth (albeit diplomatically) at all times.

What advice do you have for your younger self? We’d love to hear it!
Share below in the comment section and “obrigado!” (Thanks!)

AAP Luncheon
Andrea D. Smith, Senior Brand Director

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